Celluloid Dreamland: The Cinema of Guy Maddin
35mm Print

“[An] endlessly inventive, deliciously eccentric, and surprisingly accessible fantasy-documentary.”

Kate Stables, Sight and Sound

Geriatric hockey. Frozen horse heads jutting surreally out of the iced-over Red River. A scary Ann Savage, femme fatale of the 1945 noir classic Detour, as the director’s hairdresser mother. Guy Maddin’s wondrous My Winnipeg, a free-wheeling, fantastical mock-memoir that couldn’t possibly be mistaken for anyone else’s Winnipeg, is a sheer demented pleasure—another triumph from the movie obsessive and mad genius who is one of Canada’s (and the world’s) most distinctive directors. The film closed the book on Maddin’s Me Trilogy” and was named Best Canadian Feature at TIFF 2007. A hilarious docu-fantasia’ … At once an autobiographical fever dream, a mythopoeic history of Canada’s coldest city, and a wacky exercise in ethnography … Holding together its hallucinatory blend is the director’s inspired, entertaining narration” (James Adams, Globe and Mail). If you’ve not yet experienced the pleasures of a Maddin film, this is an excellent place to start” (VIFF).

Print courtesy of TIFF Film Reference Library

Brilliant … Ann Savage [as] Maddin’s mother remains the high priestess in this temple of memory [where] anything seems possible.”

Kristin M. Jones, Film Comment

As with David Byrne’s True Stories, Maddins’ most skew-whiff ideas—such as the frozen horses sunken in a snow-covered field—assume a poignancy that outlasts their silliness.”

Ryan Gilbey, Sight and Sound
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