Screening Dates
  • July 30 (Friday) 8:35
  • July 31 (Saturday) 6:15
  • August 1 (Sunday) 8:35
  • August 2 (Monday) 6:15
  • August 4 (Wednesday) 8:35
Streaming
  • July 23 (Friday) through August 5 (Thursday)
New Documentary

Paris Is Burning meets Larry Clark’s Kids, All the Streets Are Silent is a love letter to New York—examining race, society, fashion, and street culture.”

Tribeca Film Festival

The culture-shifting collision of hip hop and skateboarding is thoroughly, passionately unpacked in this dynamic new documentary from Montreal-born director Jeremy Elkin, a seasoned skate-video maker. Narrated by Eli Morgan Gesner, co-founder of the iconic NYC skateboarding company Zoo York, All the Streets Are Silent zeroes in on a pivotal chapter in New York history, 1987 to 1997, when Manhattan’s cauldron of youth-led subcultures married hip hop with skateboarding and gave birth to a potent (and profitable) street culture” movement that infiltrated every urban corner of the globe. The exuberant film examines the impact of melting-pot nightclubs like Club Mars, where scrappy skate kids first rubbed shoulders with hip-hop heads; the influence of White DJed radio shows embracing rising Black rap artists; the formation of street-fashion empires Supreme and Zoo York; and the culmination of the entire snowballing scene in Larry Clark’s seminal and still-controversial Kids (1995), which featured New York skate rats, including pro-rider Harold Hunter, playing versions of themselves. Legendary hip-hop producer Large Professor (Nas, A Tribe Called Quest) scores.

If you live for sneakers, skateboarding, Supreme drops, and all things hip-hop, you have late 80s and early 90s New York street culture to thank for that. And you’re probably going to love All the Streets Are Silent.”

Dane Rivera, Uproxx

A loving, tender homage to the city’s street culture before it went global … The film excels when it harnesses the wistful thrill of a bygone era, reminding us of a rich, creative past that deserves ample recognition.”

Isabelia Herrera, New York Times
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