Werewolf

Canada 2016. Dir: Ashley McKenzie. 78 min. DCP

Best Canadian Film of 2017
TORONTO FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION

FREE SCREENING! One of the strongest Canadian debuts in recent memory, Ashley McKenzie’s prize-winning first feature is a sobering, documentary-esque account of two recovering junkies making an onerous go of it in New Waterford, Nova Scotia — the writer-director-editor’s hometown. Blaise and Nessa are a young, outcast couple existing on the margins of their economically-depressed town. Enrolled in an addiction program that has them hooked on methadone, they fill their days hauling a janky lawnmower door-to-door, attempting to cobble cash together to pay for their opioid doses. The film’s intimate close-ups and handheld camerawork bespeak a careful study of the Dardenne brothers’ brand of social realism; the striking mise-en-scène, atypical score (by Youth Haunts), and unexpected moments of stylistic deviation, on the other hand, make a compelling case for McKenzie as a director already in command of her own unique aesthetic.


COARSE LANGUAGE; DRUG USE; VIOLENCE
PERSONS UNDER 14 MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT

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Technical issues forced the cancellation of The Cinematheque’s presentation of Nova Scotian filmmaker Ashley McKenzie’s award-winning Werewolf on National Canadian Film Day in April. Please join us for this free makeup screening!

 

REVIEWS

"One of the summer's best movies .... In plumbing the pitch black, Werewolf offers the distinct hope of a brighter future — at least, a brighter future for Canadian cinema."

Globe & Mail | full review

"A startling, out-of-nowhere film, and an intoxicating first feature from a rising filmmaker ... Truly memorable."

The Playlist | full review

"McKenzie’s extraordinary art, both in the construction of the drama and the composition of the images, is an art of the partial, the fragmentary, the symbolic."

New Yorker | full review