Next film:

Old Joy

USA 2006. Dir: Kelly Reichardt. 76 min. 35mm

OPENING NIGHT THURSDAY, MAY 19
SKYPE Q&A WITH KELLY REICHARDT
+ JON RAYMOND!
REFRESHMENTS & SPECIAL INTRODUCTION

6:00pm - Doors
7:00pm - Old Joy
/ Introduced by Dorothy Woodend / Post-screening Skype Q&A with Kelly Reichardt and Jon Raymond

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After the frustrating, twelve-year gap that followed her first feature, Reichardt re-emerged in 2006 with this lo-fi, minimalist masterpiece that laid the groundwork — and critical precedence — for the director’s reset career. The first of now four collaborations with writer Jon Raymond, Old Joy faithfully adapts for the screen Raymond’s enigmatic short story about two drifting-apart buddies who reunite for a weekend hiking trip in the foothills of Oregon’s Cascade Mountains. Cult musician Will Oldham (aka Bonnie “Prince” Billy) is one half of the two-hander, a wandering, past-prime hippie longing to reconnect with his hometown pal (Daniel London), a father-to-be. Featuring a scenic soundtrack by indie rock royalty Yo La Tengo, Reichardt’s second first-feature is an eloquent, incisive meditation on adulthood, alienation, and platonic(ish) male friendship in flux. “A triumph … One of the finest American films of the year” (Manohla Dargis, New York Times).

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Dorothy Woodend is the Director of Programming for DOXA Documentary Film Festival in Vancouver. In addition to her work at DOXA, she has been the film critic for The Tyee since 2004. Her work has been published in magazines, newspapers, and books across Canada and the US, as well as a number of international publications. She is a member of the Vancouver Film Critics Circle, the Alliance for Women Film Journalists, and was recently nominated as a YWCA Woman of Distinction.

 

REVIEWS

“Unique, elusive poetry … Such watchful reticence takes a bold, confident filmmaker.”

Time Out | full review

“Exquisite, achingly beautiful.”

LA Weekly | full review

“A film of microscopic mood shifts, at once open-ended and precise.”

Village Voice | full review