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To Live and Die in L.A.

USA 1985. Dir: William Friedkin. 116 min. DCP

NEW RESTORATION! ► William Friedkin, director of The French Connection, ups the high-voltage, high-violence ante in To Live and Die in L.A., a sun-bleached neo-noir thriller so slick and stylish “it’s like an episode of Miami Vice directed by Helmut Newton” (Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader). William Petersen (CSI) is federal agent Chance, who’ll stop at nothing — certainly not the bounds of the law — to bring down master counterfeiter and tormented artist Masters, played by Willem Dafoe. The luminous cinematography, by Wim Wenders mainstay Robby Müller (Paris, Texas), renders with astonishing beauty Friedkin’s cruel, claustrophobic (and often erotic) world of anxiety, obsession, cynicism, and corruption. The director hazards a hair-raising car-chase sequence that actually outdoes the famous one in The French Connection. The new wave soundtrack is by Wang Chung. The film, underappreciated and ripe for reappraisal, screens here in the new restoration debuted at Cannes in May.


FREQUENT VIOLENCE; NUDITY; SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENES
PERSONS UNDER 18 MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT
ANNUAL $3 MEMBERSHIP REQUIRED FOR THOSE 18+

 

REVIEWS

"Mr. Friedkin at his glossiest, a great-looking, riveting movie."

New York Times | full review

★★★★ "First-rate ... This is [Friedkin's] comeback."

Roger Ebert | full review