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Werewolf

Canada 2016. Dir: Ashley McKenzie. 78 min. DCP

Skype Q&A: Ashley McKenzie

"In plumbing the pitch black, Werewolf offers the distinct hope of a brighter future — at least, a brighter future for Canadian cinema."
BARRY HERTZ, GLOBE & MAIL

FREE ADMISSION! One of the strongest Canadian debuts in recent memory, Ashley McKenzie’s prize-winning first feature is a sobering, documentary-esque account of two recovering junkies making an onerous go of it in New Waterford, Nova Scotia — the writer-director-editor’s hometown. Blaise and Nessa are a young, outcast couple existing on the margins of their economically-depressed town. Enrolled in an addiction program that has them hooked on methadone, they fill their days hauling a janky lawnmower door-to-door, attempting to cobble cash together to pay for their opioid doses. The film’s intimate close-ups and handheld camerawork bespeak a close study of the Dardenne brothers’ brand of social realism; the striking mise-en-scène, atypical score (by Youth Haunts), and unexpected moments of stylistic deviation, on the other hand, make a compelling case for McKenzie as a director already in command of her own unique aesthetic.


COARSE LANGUAGE; DRUG USE; VIOLENCE
PERSONS UNDER 14 MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY AN ADULT

 

REVIEWS

"A startling, out-of-nowhere film, and an intoxicating first feature from a rising filmmaker ... Truly memorable."

The Playlist | full review

"McKenzie’s extraordinary art, both in the construction of the drama and the composition of the images, is an art of the partial, the fragmentary, the symbolic."

New Yorker | full review